The Island Country | Critical Book Review

In Richard Daub’s The Island Country, the narrative weaves through the triumphs and tragedies of multiple generations of the Smith family as they chase their elusive dreams in post-World War Two America. A literary endeavor that straddles between calm and explosive, astute and intimate, Daub navigates the intricacies of family life, shedding light on the hidden passions and resentments beneath the veneer of an all-American household.


Unveiling Tensions in Suburbia

The story unfolds on a bleak Long Island day in 1954, setting the stage for a post-war family saga far from the idyllic. Detective Philip Smith, a conflicted figure in a formal Navy uniform, directs attention to a distant flag, signaling early on that happiness is not a staple in the Smith household. Daub skillfully introduces family members, emphasizing dramatic dynamics over harmonious relationships, painting a vivid picture of a household overshadowed by foreboding and repression.


Characters in the Shadows

As Daub delves into the Smith family, he unravels a complex tapestry of flawed characters. Philip’s racism, Eunice’s pill addiction, Joyce’s stifled artistic talent, Philip Jr.’s peculiar religious calling, and the overlooked Oscar’s emotional eating form a combustible mix. The family dynamics permeate their interactions in the neighborhood, school, and work, unveiling disturbing attitudes of the era, including racism, sexism, and homophobia.


Shattered Dreams and New Generations

As the narrative unfolds, Joyce emerges relatively unscathed, despite marrying her troubled high-school boyfriend. The story transcends generations, introducing Griff, a troublemaker, and Stacy, a seemingly normal exterior harboring darkness within. Daub’s vignette-style storytelling maintains a brisk pace, allowing time to pass rapidly as characters evolve, learn, and face the consequences of their actions.


Societal Reflections Across Decades

Structured in short sections, The Island Country mirrors the evolving decades, capturing the essence of different times and societal shifts. Daub skillfully juxtaposes the horror and absurdity of past acceptances, such as Eunice’s drug problem and the casual promotion of LSD. The novel becomes a poignant exploration of dysfunctional family dynamics and societal pressures, delving into human relationships and the perpetual quest for happiness.


A Glimpse into the Human Struggle

The Island Country stands as a thought-provoking exploration of family nature and the relentless pursuit of belonging. Daub’s rich character development and a sweeping journey from the 1950s to the 2020s offer a captivating glimpse into the lives of the Smith family and those drawn into their complex orbit. The novel’s blend of poignant storytelling and societal commentary makes it a compelling read that reflects both the timeless and ever-changing aspects of the American experience.

Publisher, Genre, Print Length, ISBN

PublisherGenrePrint LengthISBN
IndependentLiterary Fiction/Historical230 pages9781946094100

In Richard Daub’s The Island Country, the narrative weaves through the triumphs and tragedies of multiple generations of the Smith family as they chase their elusive dreams in post-World War Two America. A literary endeavor that straddles between calm and explosive, astute and intimate, Daub navigates the intricacies of family life, shedding light on the…