Death of the Antagonist | Critical Book Review

Ron Jensen’s Death of the Antagonist takes readers on a thrilling ride through a concoction of action-packed sequences and mind-bending science fiction. Erin Britton explores the highs and lows in this indie sci-fi novel, revealing a narrative that fuses high-concept technologies, extraterrestrial invasion, and the intricate dance between science and religion.

A Fantastical Onset: Alien Intrusion in Downtown Seattle

The story kicks off with an alien scout descending upon downtown Seattle through a seemingly innocuous portal. Jensen skillfully paints a vivid picture of the winged creature’s struggle to infiltrate its target location, using advanced technology that proves both intriguing and challenging. The narrative unfolds with a dose of wry humor as the scout faces setbacks and hurdles, setting the tone for the fantastical journey ahead.

Pastor Ian’s Descent: A Collision of Personal Turmoil and Extraterrestrial Threat

Pastor Ian Preston, at the center of this cosmic maelstrom, grapples with a troubled mind and a life in disarray. Jensen weaves a complex tale that explores the intersection of science, religion, and human frailty. As Ian becomes an unwitting key to humanity’s survival, readers are plunged into a narrative filled with metaphysical conundrums, nightmares, and unexpected human connections.

Alien Invasion: Probing Minds and Unpacking Dreams

Jensen’s worldbuilding shines as the aliens plot an invasion by infiltrating Ian’s mind, delving into thought-provoking commentary on mental illness and societal perceptions. The mosquito-like insectoids from the Mount of Caves are vividly depicted, their civilization and motivations adding depth to the impending threat. The graphic description of the mind-invasion process heightens the danger posed by these extraterrestrial beings.

Human Element: Dark Pasts and Unlikely Heroes

While the alien threat is palpable, the most disturbing elements emerge from the human characters’ dark pasts. Ian, Aurora, and Cletus grapple with the consequences of child abuse and suicide, adding layers of complexity to their characters. The trio’s rapid intertwining, though occasionally rushed, serves a purpose as they become an unlikely but effective team against the alien invaders.

Balancing Act: Theological Diversions and Plot Tension

Jensen skillfully balances science fiction, real-world elements, and weighty religious discussions. The characters navigate through theological discourse, particularly Aurora, providing depth to the plot. However, at times, these diversions may feel a tad excessive, momentarily veering off the primary course.

Tension and Resolve: Humanity’s Fight for Survival

In the end, Death of the Antagonist emerges as a tense and riveting sci-fi tale, blending believable portrayals of human goodness and darkness. Jensen crafts a world where the aliens pose a credible threat, yet the unexpected strength and determination of the human trio offer hope for Earth’s salvation. The narrative’s ability to keep readers on the edge of their seats showcases Jensen’s prowess in creating an engaging and thought-provoking science fiction experience.

Publisher, Genre, Print Length, and ISBN

PublisherGenrePrint LengthISBN
Science Fiction & Fantasy292 pages979-8987489314

Ron Jensen’s Death of the Antagonist takes readers on a thrilling ride through a concoction of action-packed sequences and mind-bending science fiction. Erin Britton explores the highs and lows in this indie sci-fi novel, revealing a narrative that fuses high-concept technologies, extraterrestrial invasion, and the intricate dance between science and religion. A Fantastical Onset: Alien…