Category: General Fiction

Marco Polo Mother & Son | Critical Book Review

Thoreau Lovell’s Marco Polo Mother & Son, a poignant literary exploration, delves into the intricate relationship between the late Georgiana and her grieving son, George. Lovell’s exceptional writing skillfully navigates the parallel lives of these two characters, creating a captivating narrative that blurs the lines between fiction and memoir. The Chalk and Cheese Dynamic Georgiana…

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Hackett at Large | Critical Book Review

Hackett at Large by Jack Fitzgerald takes readers on a whimsical journey through 1960s Paris, narrated by the affable fictional journalist Ben Hackett. Fitzgerald’s optimistic portrayal of life in the city during that period unfolds through a series of interconnected short stories, adding a rosy hue to the charm of Paris. Charming Encounters with Historical…

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Perseverance: Journey to Alaska | Critical Book Review

Embarking on a journey to a dream destination requires more than just an adventurous spirit; it demands courage, preparation, and unwavering perseverance. In “Perseverance” by Steven Harrison, the author takes readers on a remarkable expedition to Alaska, defying the challenges of the COVID-19 era, all while astride an e-bike. Harrison’s narrative begins in California, his…

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How Boys Learn | Critical Book Review

In Jeff Kirchick’s “How Boys Learn,” a collection of short stories delving into the lives of boys, men, and the transitional stages in between, Warren Maxwell contemplates the overarching theme of melancholy and the ceaseless pursuit of maturity or self-improvement. The narrative navigates through small, post-industrial towns, broken families, and the peculiarities of cloistered liberal…

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The Book of Reading | Critical Book Review

The Book of Reading by Eric Larsen, a historical fiction and time travel saga published by Atmosphere Press, unfolds as a captivating exploration of literature’s profound impact on history, challenging norms and questioning the endurance of love and truth. Literary Guardianship: A Bold Proposition Larsen introduces a daring premise that literature possesses the unique ability…

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The More Beyond | Critical Book Review

Jill Charlotte Thomas’s “The More Beyond” offers a poignant yet glaring study of Morton Guthrie, a girl grappling with the complexities of self-discovery. While the narrative shares echoes with Sylvia Plath’s “The Bell Jar,” the fractured-yet-coherent structure propels readers into Morton’s world, filled with societal disillusionment and a struggle for personal identity. Consumerism and Superficiality…

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NG173: A Brand of Racism | Critical Book Review

In Donald E. English’s NG173, the narrative unfolds around Samuel Freeman, a determined Black man facing racial injustice while serving in the military during World War II. Despite his skills, Samuel finds himself relegated to subordinate tasks, a victim of prejudice. The story takes a heart-wrenching turn when his romantic involvement with a German girl…

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But I Digretch | Critical Book Review

But I Digretch by Gretchen Astro Turner invites readers into a world of delightful absurdities that encapsulate the intricate dance of human emotions. This collection of short stories, pulsating with humor, takes us on a journey through the fringes of society, exploring the nuances of existence in its various shades. Touching on themes of emotion,…

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Henry’s Chapel | Critical Book Review

Graham Guest’s Henry’s Chapel takes readers on a cinematic journey through the tragic intricacies of an incestuous Southern family. The novel, presented as a movie titled Lawnmower of a Jealous God, ventures into taboo territories, unflinchingly addressing dark themes such as bestiality and incest within a troubled Texas family. Henry’s Troubled World The central focus…

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This Is Who We Are Now | Critical Book Review

This Is Who We Are Now by James Bailey claims to be a sassy, hilarious, heartwarming, and provocative surprise. However, beneath the veneer of humor and warmth lies a narrative that, while not devoid of merit, succumbs to clichéd family drama tropes. Tangled Relationships Unraveled Henry Bradfield’s return to his Vermont hometown for a reluctant…

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